µ#4: We Need Animals

Looking into the eyes of a loving cat is the essence of bliss. Animals know what life is all about, and we need to cherish them. Without them around us, we are impoverished. We need to occasionally look into the eyes of someone that is not human, be it a dog, a bird, a cat, whatever. I prefer cats, but whatever helps!

#77: Animal Personalities

Maybe it’s because of Covid and working from home, but I am spending more time thinking about animals than I used to. When I moved to the US from Germany, I felt like I entered an alien planet. Almost everything was different, down to fauna and flora. Sure, Germany has oak trees too, but Oregon White Oaks (Quercus garryana) is not the same as the German Oak (Quercus robur), and Douglas Firs and Sequoias are simply in a class of their own compared to the little stick-size fir trees in Europe are allowed to grow into.

The birds struck me as most different, even though I was able to recognize some similarities. American Robins are clearly related to European Blackbirds, maniacally rummaging around in the leaves but rewarding the evening listener in spring with fantastic melodic cadenzas. Chickadees (black-capped and chestnut-backed) can compete with Great and Blue Tits, but sound different. Two species of Nuthatches (red- and white-breasted), of which the smaller red-breasted is fearless. Jays are loud always, and it seems the Steller’s Jays know they are prettier than the Scrub Jays. There seems to be a hierarchy.

The real character actors though are the grey squirrels, deer and raccoons. I think I am able to communicate with the deer very well, and they are smart. Much smarter than I (stupid human) would ever have thought. They seem to understand hand gestures, and can read my intentions. When I accidentally walk where they are headed too, I retreat and signal clearly that I am making way – and I see them respond by waiting rather than jumping away. I see different personalities, and if I occasionally throw an apple to them in the heat of summer (as thirst quenchers), they thank me, clearly.

Grey Squirrels are always a hoot, and I am trying to understand their nervous ticks, hand tremors, tail twitches, and sounds of annoyance. I have learned to mimic their sounds, and am able to get their attention – but I am clearly saying things wrongly, for I am getting looks of disapproval. The occasional raccoon will be happy if there is cat food left outdoors, and will make eye contact with me to make sure I will let them eat.

I have started to rethink matters a bit. These are people, but in different bodies. Am I anthropomorphizing animals? Well, I think most of the time, we are anthropomorphizing humans far too much. Instead, it would help to remind ourselves that everything around us is just as modern, just as advanced from their own genetic perspective as us lowly humans. Sure, a squirrel’s body can look funny, but I am not that sure my own is such a prize either. The squirrel is surely more athletic. And as to cats – I have yet been able to communicate with every cat. They know who they can talk to or not. We have an understanding.

This is not about politics, vegetarianism, or anything like that (I am currently not a vegetarian – I tried it, but it did not work out for me, and I would consider myself more of a flexitarian). This is just about our human tendency to diminish life other than our own, and the prevalent arrogant assumption that we are not like animals, and they are not like us.

When I can look into the eyes of one of those animal people around the house, I see eyes looking at me with an intelligence and with feelings that are very much relatable, as soon as you allow for the possibility. This is not my yard. I am sharing it with others, and have to make sure they are doing well. I cannot save the world, but I can make sure, as much as I can. to at least approach my fellow beings with the dignity and respect they deserve.

Surely, such a perspective is made much easier by a welcome under-abundance of mosquitos and ticks around this area here. And as to voles and the occasional rat, I am counting on the neighborhood cats and raccoons to develop strategies to help me out with the problems caused by those.

Nothing really can be helped by seeing us outside of nature – maybe that can be a learning lesson here for all of us in the pandemic. We need nature around us, and we need to develop community with it and its non-human peoples.